Are You Menopausal? 4 Reasons You Should Get a Menopause Test

Your periods have become erratic. Tears come from nowhere. Sleep is elusive, and you’re plagued with sudden, unaccustomed bouts of irritability and unexplained fatigue. On top of it all, you sometimes feel as though you’ve inadvertently walked into a furnace going at full blast!

Could this mayhem be . . . MENOPAUSE? All this mayhem could mean it’s time to schedule a menopause test.

The onset of perimenopause to full-on menopause can take as long as ten years. Sometimes women go for lengthy spans of time without periods, only to have them resume. So how do you know for sure when menopause has truly arrived?

If you’ve missed a period or have begun experiencing some or all of the symptoms above (or others associated with menopause such as vaginal dryness, low libido and painful intercourse), then you should consider having a menopause test.

Why? Here are four good reasons.

A menopause test, which tests your blood, can:

  1. Eliminate (or confirm) the possibility of pregnancy
  2. Help confirm that you’ve actually embarked on your menopausal journey
  3. Enable you to restore your hormones to optimal, youthful levels and banish those life-disrupting symptoms
  4. Help guard against development of chronic disease

You Need to Know What Your Blood Can Tell You

Out-of-control menopausal symptoms can make you feel helpless. But knowing what your blood can tell you gives you control over your erratic hormones, which in turn quiets your body and mind.

As you enter perimenopause ― the beginning of menopause ― your oestrogens and progesterone levels begin to fall, disrupting your hormonal balance.

A lot of people mistakenly think menopause is all about oestrogens. But your hormones don’t work in isolation. They’re like a symphony, and all need to play the right notes relative to the others.

In other words, your sex hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and testosterone) all need to be in balance ― that is, in the right ratio, one to another, and at their respective optimal levels. When one hormone level (such as oestradiol, a type of oestrogen) drops, it affects the others.

A menopause test does two important things. It:

  1. Measures the levels of hormones in your blood
  2. Enables a doctor specialised in restorative medicine and extensively trained in bioidentical hormones to accurately prescribe bioidentical hormone restorative therapy (BHRT) to restore your optimal hormone ratios.

Rebalancing your hormones to the proper levels enables you to rid your body and mind of disturbing menopausal symptoms and restore equilibrium to your life. Bioidentical hormones exactly match the molecular makeup of your natural hormones, so they’re easily absorbed and have no harmful side effects.

Blood Tests Also Give You Long-Term Benefits

The benefit of doing a menopause test doesn’t end with expelling menopausal symptoms. Throughout menopause, you’ll need periodic retesting. Why? Hormones continually fluctuate. Retesting allows your doctor to adjust your BHRT prescriptions as needed to maintain your optimal hormone ratios. BHRT has to be customised to each woman’s individual needs.

But you should also continue your blood tests and BHRT throughout your postmenopausal years. That’s the joy of BHRT over HRT! We can take BHRT for life!

Science has gained a tremendous amount of knowledge about physiological markers that allow us to detect disease risk and foresee impending illnesses and disease. The knowledge you gain from your blood tests enables you to become aware of future risks to your health and prevent those risks from becoming reality.

With hormonal disruption, you’re more susceptible to chronic disease. With regular blood tests and ongoing fine-tuning of your hormones, you can forestall degenerative effects of ageing such as diabetes, cancer, obesity and other diseases.

In short, blood tests are an indispensable tool for keeping your health (and possibly your sanity!) on an even keel through menopause, but they also enable you to recapture the vitality and health of a younger you as you age.

Menopause Woman’s Healthy Woman 40+ Hormone Blood Test includes testing for total oestrogen (oestrone, oestradiol, oestriol), progesterone, total testosterone and DHEA-S.

Why not get started today on a symptom-free, healthier life?

SOURCE:

Braman, N. Blood Test to Determine Menopause. eHow.

Hair loss, Hormones and How To Regain Beautiful Hair

In preparation for the Big Change she knew was coming, my friend Isabella did a lot of reading. She learned that all in all, despite its reputation, menopause can be an exciting time of life ― a time of growth and self-exploration (not to mention freedom from inconvenient and sometimes painful periods).

Having always been a ’think-positive’ person, Isabella took it all to heart and bravely faced the onset of menopause with the attitude of setting forth on an exciting new venture.

Until she realised she was losing her hair.

Isabella’s hair had always been her glory, but after every wash and blow-dry, more of it ended up on the bathroom floor. Week after week, her hair became thinner and thinner. Finally, her nearly-bare scalp was on plain view for all the world to see, and as her ponytail became ever smaller and wispier, the always-optimistic Isabella grew increasingly depressed.

Isabella wasn’t the first woman to experience dramatic hair loss as she embarked on this life transition. It also happens at other times of hormonal upheaval. For example, after pregnancy.

When a woman is pregnant, her oestrogen levels soar, and her hair may become dramatically longer, thicker, fuller and shinier. However, after giving birth, her oestrogen levels plunge. The shedding and resting periods of her hair’s growth cycle lengthen, and she experiences hair loss, which, thankfully, is usually temporary.

Although it often catches women by surprise, menopause, too, brings hormonal changes that disrupt the hair growth cycle. Nearly half of all women experience menopausal hair thinning.

What Do Your Ovaries Have to Do With Your Hair?

Your ovaries produce oestrogen and progesterone. When you’re premenopausal, their levels, as a general rule, are at their peak and (oestrogen more directly than progesterone) help keep testosterone at its correct level and within safe ratios. But with the onset of menopause, your ovaries begin to shut down, and your oestrogen and progesterone levels drop, setting in motion a process that can lead to thinning hair.

You don’t normally have a large amount of testosterone. But as oestrogen and progesterone diminish at a greater and faster rate relative to testosterone, your testosterone gains in comparative strength. When that happens, more testosterone is converted into a potent androgenic hormone, DHT, via an enzyme known as 5-alpha reductase.

We now have an increase of DHT. The increased DHT production wants to kill your hair, literally.

DHT attaches to receptor cells in scalp follicles and causes them to shrink. That’s a near-death sentence for healthy hair. Hair will thin, although in women it rarely results in completely bald patches.

Stressed Tresses Are Unhappy Tresses

High levels of stress, along with anxiety and depression, are a common manifestation of the mood swings frequently experienced by women during menopause. It’s also among the most common symptoms associated with menopausal hair thinning.

The growth cycle of hair has four phases:

  • Anagen: Growth phase, lasting 2–6 years
  • Catagen: Short phase (approximately 2–3 weeks) when the follicle shrinks a bit
  • Telogen: Inactive phase
  • Exogen: Hair falls out

The average woman has 90,000 to 150,000 hairs on her head at any one time, in all different phases, and she loses around 50–100 a day. Dermatologist Kurt Stenn, author of Hair: A Human History, believes that very high stress levels disrupt the growth cycle, prematurely halting the growth (anagen) phase. The hairs all go into the resting (telogen) phase and then, after a three-month delay, fall out (the exogen phase) at around 10 times the usual rate.

This hair-loss pattern has been shown with mice after being stressed by loud noises. It has also been demonstrated with rhesus macaque monkeys who were found to have cortisol (the stress hormone) dominance.

Interestingly, declining hormone levels are one of the primary causes of continuous physiological stress. This in itself puts both the body and the brain under an incredible and continuous stress load. If you’re highly stressed and menopausal, it’s a very bad mix. Your overall stress will then be exacerbated, both physically and mentally.

Stress mutes hormones, which will sequentially affect your female hormones, testosterone production, and DHT production. The amount of DHT production in the body from day to day depends on the amount and balance of testosterone.

Unfortunately, losing your hair is upsetting and kicks many women’s stress level into overdrive, which compounds the problem.

How To Restore Hormones For Beautiful Healthy Hair?

Because menopausal hair loss is so linked to hormonal disruption ― hormone imbalances associated with the end of fertility ― it’s a signal that you need to see a restorative medicine doctor who is fully trained in bioidentical hormones restorative therapy (BHRT).

Your restorative medical doctor will test your hormones to assess their status and prescribe naturally derived hormones that have exactly the same molecular structure as the hormones made in your own body.

You can read all about Hormonal Health in Jill’s book, ‘The Menopause Cure‘.

The right hormones in the right doses will retune your hormones ― bring them into the optimal ratios needed to restore their hormonal balance… as well as a full head of beautiful, healthy hair!

SOURCES

Beck, J. Why Stress Makes Your Hair Fall Out. The Atlantic. Mar. 2, 2016.
Causes of Hair Loss. American Hair Loss Association.
Gottfried, S. Hair Loss, Hormones and How to Regain Your Luscious Locks. Dr. Sara Gottfried MD.
Hormonal Changes ― Female Hair Loss. Medic8.
Menopause ― Female Hair Loss Guide. Medic8.

Why does BHRT Work for Everyone but Me?

We hear wonderful things about bioidentical hormone restorative therapy (BHRT), and those glowing reports foster high hopes ― but, sadly, sometimes the experience doesn’t live up to our expectations.

I’ve heard the above question many times, along with others:

  • How come I feel no improvement since taking the prescribed hormones?
  • How come I get more headaches?
  • How come my hair hasn’t returned to its full, healthy, shiny look, as promised?
  • How come my nails are still brittle and cracking?
  • How come I still suffer from mood swings, hot flushes and brain fog?
  • How come my breasts are tender? (A sure sign of oestrogen dominance)
  • How come this natural therapy doesn’t work for me? It’s just not fair!

How come, how come, how come . . . .?

Maybe the answer doesn’t lie in the fundamentals of BHRT. Maybe you just got the wrong doctor ― one who isn’t qualified in this specialty. The person you go to see may be a doctor, but if you experience no improvements or things get worse, then that doctor most certainly is not an expert in restorative medicine or bioidentical hormones.

It’s important to understand that bioidentical hormone therapy is a complex specialisation, and doctors need extensive training to practice it correctly. So the first thing you need to do is find a doctor with the needed knowledge, credentials and experience.

I can assure you that, when you are treated by a doctor trained and experienced in BHRT, it will definitely work for you, not against you. What is more, you will feel its enormous benefits almost immediately. Hot flushes will be calmed, foggy memory cleared, vitality and energy restored and enhanced, and positive thinking renewed.

In short, you will discover the old, familiar YOU, and most likely an even better version ― a better version because this is the time in life when we are at our best. We have everything. We’re experienced, mature, knowledgeable and at our peak intellectually. At this stage, only one thing can hold us back: our declining hormone levels!

Throughout life, we mature for the better through lessons learned and experiences gained. Who wants to lose their love of life, their vitality and/or their cognitive power at forty or fifty? It would be more than sad to let go of that experienced, sophisticated, intellectually mature woman you’ve become.

You don’t have to. You have an option: You can restore your hormones and get your life back. Life will be fun again.

What Happens Next?

Once you find your bioidentical hormone specialist, he or she will request specific blood testing to be done. Test results allow your doctor to understand the exact status of your hormones in order to prescribe the hormones you need in the specific amounts required to match your own personal physiological requirements.

Hormones have to adhere to specific hormone levels and ratios. If they don’t, harmony and balance within your body will remain elusive. The art of BHRT is finding that balance ― a balance that has meaning, the balance necessary to optimise your health status.

It isn’t something that can be done by just any doctor ― certainly not by a doctor who simply got up out of bed one morning and decided to become a ‘specialist’ in dishing out bioidentical hormones. Again, a true BHRT doctor must have extensive training and knowledge.

How Can You Be Sure BHRT Won’t Work Against You?

When prescribed correctly, your body is setup to accept these natural bioidentical hormones. On the other hand, HRT hormone molecules are synthetic and therefore cannot be effective.

Let me explain.

The major issue with synthetic hormones is that they are not like our own hormones. Because they are different in molecular structure, the body cannot understand, metabolise or excrete them easily. As a result, they cause a toxic build-up that increases cancer risk.

In contrast, bioidentical hormones are exact copies of the hormones we have in our bodies. Their molecular structure is the same.

Exact, not similar…

Exact. For this reason, the human infrastructure is ready and willing to accept these hormones. In fact, the body needs these hormones. The body knows what they are and recognizes them as their own.

If we think about it logically, of course bioidentical hormones will work when prescribed at the correct levels and ratios by a bioidentical hormone expert. Why wouldn’t they? They have the exact molecular structure as those naturally produced in our bodies ― only now, unfortunately, at lower levels because of our transition into perimenopause.

The truth is, to avoid the very uncomfortable, and in some cases debilitating symptoms we suffer in menopause, our hormone levels only need to be topped up and brought back into balance.

Symptoms such as depression, mood swings, headaches, hot flushes, weight gain, low libido, loss of confidence, hair loss, foggy memory, fatigue and more are, quite simply, withdrawal symptoms. In perimenopause, your hormone levels suddenly and quite drastically decline, leaving the brain and body very confused. Your body goes into a state of shock because it is missing those hormones it needs to get back on an even keel.

Symptoms are your body’s way of talking to you. Telling you something is wrong. We need to learn to listen to our bodies and restore those very precious missing molecules. Only when they are prescribed incorrectly will bioidentical hormones not work and potentially cause problems.

The key to successful BHRT is to find the right doctor ― one who is highly trained and experienced. When you find that doctor, it will work. Bioidentical hormones are safe and highly efficient when properly prescribed.

I can tell you from my own experience that restoring your hormones to their proper balance can give you back your happy, healthy self, free of debilitating symptoms. Best of all, you’ll learn that ‘the change’ in your life can be a truly positive change ― one that ushers in an exciting time of health, personal growth and productivity.

You can also understand far more by reading Jill’s book.

Bioidentical Oestrogen – Smooth Your Path Through Menopause

Smooth Your Path Through Menopause

When perimenopause arrives, it can turn your world upside down! It’s the first announcement that menopause is on its way, and even if you’re still having your periods, hormonal changes are going on. They can’t be seen, but they certainly can be felt.

In a worst-case scenario, hot flushes and night sweats arrive to disrupt your days and make sleep elusive. Fatigue becomes a constant companion and your brain feels wrapped in wet cotton wool. You may become more moody, more volatile . . . even slip into depression. And to make matters worse, the pounds seem to pile on, uninvited, and refuse to leave.

Who wouldn’t be depressed?

Up until that point, you probably hadn’t thought a lot about your hormones. Ever since puberty, they’ve gone along, unobserved and for the most part quietly doing their job in perfect harmony. But now their job is changing ― along with your life.

Let’s take a look at some of the culprits.

Meet the Oestrogen Trio

Many women think of oestrogen as a single hormone, but oestrogen is actually a general term that encompasses three distinct primary hormones: oestrone (E1), oestradiol (E2) and oestriol (E3).

During your reproductive years, oestradiol, which is secreted by the ovaries, is the most active of the oestrogens. It’s the predominant sex hormone and responsible for the characteristics that make you “feminine” ― sex organs, breast development and curvy fat deposits around the hips and thighs. It also plays a major role in your menstrual cycle and bone health.

At this stage, oestradiol is 12 times more potent than oestrone and 80 times more potent than oestriol.

Oestradiol keeps your uterine lining healthy and ― just in case ― prepared for pregnancy. If you become pregnant, oestriol, a weak oestrogen, steps in as the primary oestrogen and thickens the uterine lining, which provides blood to the placenta. Large quantities of oestriol are released for the baby’s well-being.

With menopause, oestrone takes over as the dominant oestrogen. Oestrone is a “danger” hormone because it carries the potential for increased risk of breast and endometrial cancer. For that reason, it needs to be monitored to ensure it remains in balance.

Menopause Disrupts the Harmony

Beginning with perimenopause (the onset of menopause), oestradiol begins a dramatic decline that often heralds the arrival of physical and emotional menopausal symptoms.

For many women, these symptoms include erratic moods, stress, inability to cope, frustration, sadness and, in the worst instances, severe depression and feelings of hopelessness. If a woman has hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, vaginal dryness, low libido and other physical symptoms, these feelings are magnified.

It’s estimated that between 8% and 15% of women going through menopause experience some degree of depression, which is most common during the perimenopausal transition to menopause.

Dr Dzugan is one of the few doctors who recognises the true source of this kind of depression, which is hormone-induced. Unfortunately, many doctors often treat their patients with antidepressants, which are inappropriate and drive the situation from bad to worse.

Antidepressants just don’t work, and typically the dosage is then increased with, again, no improvement. As Dr Dzugan has told me more than once, “In these cases, quite often, a second or third antidepressant is prescribed, along with mood-stabilising and anti-epileptic drugs.”

If you think there has to be a better way, you’re right.

Oestrogens to the Rescue

When you arrive at menopause, oestrone replaces oestradiol as the primary oestrogen. However, oestrone is a weaker oestrogen and can’t combat menopausal symptoms, whether emotional or physical.

There is, however, a solution.

Bioidentical oestradiol, in the proper ratio with oestriol, can restore your hormonal equilibrium. It has been proven to reliably banish hot flushes and other physical symptoms associated with menopause nearly instantaneously.

Bioidentical oestrogen therapy also boosts your serotonin level. Although actually a neurotransmitter, serotonin is known as the “feel-good hormone.” It fights depression, elevates mood and promotes sleep. What is more, it increases your production of GABA, a neurotransmitter with calming effects. It also raises endorphins, which act to control pain, ease stress, relieve frustration and even slow the ageing process.

What Else Do You Need?

Your endocrine system ― that is, your hormones ― act interdependently, and for them to function properly, you need each one in the proper quantity. In other words, they have to be balanced.

That means you will also need progesterone and testosterone.

Progesterone:

Although your oestradiol levels decline rapidly as you transition into menopause, progesterone levels may fall even faster, and by the time you reach full menopause, your progesterone may be as low as it normally is in men.

As a result, your oestrogen level may top that of progesterone, resulting in a condition called oestrogen dominance. That simply means you have too much oestrogen relative to progesterone.

Oestrogen dominance may also result from exposure to hormone-disrupting toxic chemicals that mimic estrogens. Because these chemicals create false oestrogens, they can also throw your oestrogen/progesterone ratio off balance.

Symptoms of oestrogen dominance include severe headaches, depression, anxiety, fuzzy thinking, water retention, weight gain and digestive problems.

Even more concerning, oestrogen dominance increases your risk of breast and uterine cancers, so it’s extremely important to restore your oestrogen and progesterone to the proper balance.

Testosterone:

Many women are unaware that testosterone is as important for women as it is for men. If you have low-T during menopause, you’ll have trouble with concentration and energy. Your muscles will become flabby and your bones brittle. Your sex drive and fantasy will be in “sleep mode,” and you’ll lack confidence and determination.

Women’s testosterone levels can begin to diminish as much as 10 years before full menopause.

Oestrogen and testosterone levels are closely related, and adding testosterone to your bioidentical hormone therapy may be needed to bring these two hormones back into sync.

How Do You Get What You Need?

It’s important to remember that bioidentical hormone restorative therapy is a complex specialism, and doctors need extensive training to do it properly. So the first thing you need to do is find a doctor with the needed knowledge, credentials and experience.

When you find your bioidentical hormone specialist, you’ll need to do testing. Testing is what allows your doctor to understand the exact status of your hormones so he or she can prescribe the hormones you need in the specific amounts you require.

I can tell you from my own experience that restoring your hormones to their proper balance can give you back your happy, healthy self, free of debilitating symptoms. Best of all, you’ll learn that “the change” in your life can be a truly positive change ― one that ushers in an exciting time of health, personal growth and productivity.

SOURCES:

Estrogens: E1. E2, E3. Rx Compound Centre.

Hormones and Depression in Women. BodyLogicMD.com

Studd. J. When is depression in women a matter of hormones? TotalHealth.co.uk. Aug. 17, 2012.

Mandal, A. Estrogen Types. News, Medical Life Sciences.

Menopause. Progesterone Therapy.

Peterson, D. Three Stages of a Woman’s Life Require Three Different Estrogens. Wellness Alternatives.

Pick. M. Estrogen Dominance ― Is It Real? Women to Women.

Testosterone Deficiency May Exacerbate Menopause. Testosterone and Menopause. July 14, 2014.

Got the Menopause Blues?

Magnesium Could be the Solution

Studies show that magnesium benefits symptoms of anxiety, irritability, insomnia and water retention ― all common symptoms of menopause. In addition, magnesium increases levels of the mood-elevating neurotransmitter serotonin, which is important to improving sleep and memory, as well as depression.

When the perimenopause or menopause arrives, you may find yourself hit with an avalanche of life-disrupting symptoms. Could a precipitous drop in your magnesium level be the cause?

Over the past half century, magnesium intake has plummeted, thanks to mineral depletion in soil and water, resulting in mineral-poor diets. Consequently, around 75% of people in developed countries are now magnesium-deficient.

Most of us are unaware that our bodies rely on magnesium to perform more than 600 metabolic functions. However, we may become very aware of the effects of magnesium depletion.

Lack of magnesium can make itself felt in a number of ways ― stress, anxiety, depression, mood swings, irritability and insomnia, to name a few.

Depending on your magnesium levels over time, you may have previously escaped these problems or experienced them only irregularly. But with the advent of perimenopause and menopause, some or all of these symptoms commonly appear or worsen for many women. Some may be severe.

One can’t say that all menopausal symptoms are due solely to magnesium deficiency, but it can certainly be a major contributor.

And it may hold a key to relieving these distressing symptoms.

Why Magnesium Levels Fall with Menopause

Beginning with perimenopause, your oestrogen, progesterone and testosterone hormones fluctuate widely.

During your child-bearing years, when you need more minerals, oestrogen promotes magnesium absorption to accommodate pregnancy. However, as oestrogen levels begin to fall with perimenopause, your ability to absorb magnesium diminishes.

The result is hypomagnesemia (magnesium deficiency), which, if not addressed, will continue to worsen with age.

How Magnesium Helps Manage Stress and Anxiety

Stress and anxiety rank high among complaints of menopausal women. The reason? As oestrogen levels drop, you also lose the ability to effectively regulate cortisol levels.

Cortisol is commonly known as “The Stress Hormone,” and in some instances it serves a useful purpose. For example, it can help you respond instinctively to emergencies, summon courage when threatened and weather daunting challenges.

However, too much cortisol for too long leads to chronic stress, which isn’t good.

In addition to producing stress, high cortisol impairs normal cell regeneration, production of vital hormones, cognitive function and healthy digestion.

Stress begins with your pituitary gland, which releases ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), and in turn, ACTH stimulates your adrenal glands to produce cortisol.

However, if you have enough magnesium, it can:
· moderate the amount of ACTH released from your pituitary
· lessen your adrenal glands’ response to ACTH, preventing a massive release of cortisol
· block the blood/brain barrier, preventing cortisol from entering your brain

Dr. Carolyn Dean, who authored the bestselling The Magnesium Miracle, explains how, under stress, “your body creates stress hormones causing a cascade of physical effects, all of which consume magnesium.”

It becomes a vicious cycle: Stress robs you of the magnesium you need to prevent stress, which makes stress still worse. If your magnesium level is low to begin with, it can be difficult to break the cycle.

To make matters worse, during periods of prolonged stress, you further reduce your magnesium store by passing it out with urine!

And Relieve Depression

Under the relentless assault of excessive cortisol and chronic stress, people may abandon healthy mood-regulation strategies. Consequently, the longer you’re stressed, the more likely it becomes that you will find yourself on a downward slide into depression.

There is, however, hope. There’s good reason magnesium is called “the chill pill”, “nature’s relaxant” and the “anti-stress/anxiety mineral”. In one study, researchers found magnesium equally as effective as antidepressants in relieving depression, often within a week.

An interesting article by researchers George and Karen Eby theorizes that stress, together with magnesium deficiency, can cause damage to brain neurons that results in depression. On the bright side, they observe that “Magnesium was found usually effective for treatment of depression in general use.”

Studies also show that magnesium therapy benefits anxiety, irritability, insomnia and water retention ― all common symptoms of menopause.

In addition, magnesium increases levels of the mood-elevating neurotransmitter serotonin, which is important to improving sleep and memory, as well as depression.

Is Magnesium Right for You?

The magnesium in today’s refined flour is only 16% of what used to be contained in whole wheat flour.
The soil in which we grow food is depleted of minerals, and flouride has banished magnesium from our drinking water in many localities.

A hundred years ago, when magnesium was plentiful, depression occurred in only about 1% of the population. In the US, it’s now around 6.9% for adults. And as of 2014, 19.7% of people in the UK aged 16 and over showed symptoms of anxiety or depression.

Many women find upping their magnesium intake is a simple, natural way to ease menopausal symptoms, relax and get a good night’s sleep.

And because magnesium deficiency is so common and so important to many bodily functions, it may be wise to consider increasing your magnesium prior to menopause. (It can even prevent a sudden heart attack!)

There are tests to measure magnesium levels, but the serum (blood) test often fails to detect deficiencies. Some physicians recommend the red blood cell (RBC) essential mineral test as being more accurate.

You can bolster magnesium levels by including high-magnesium foods such as dark leafy greens, nuts, seeds, fish, beans, whole grains, avocados, yogurt, bananas, dried fruit and dark chocolate in your diet.

However, since magnesium in food is limited, you may also want to consider topping up by suing a high-quality magnesium supplement.

References

Alban, D. 8 Ways Magnesium Relieves Anxiety and Stress. Be Brain Fit.

Curb, J.D. Endocrine Function and Magnesium Menopause and Premenstrual Syndrome. National Health Federation.

Deans, E. Magnesium and the Brain: The Original Chill Pill, June 12, 2011.

Eby, G.&K. Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment. George Eby Research, Medical Hypotheses, Jan. 2006.

Magnolia. Food and Medicine: Magnesium for Anxiety & Panic Attacks in Perimenopause. The Perimenopause Blog, Jan. 27, 2017.

Pick, M. The Destructive Effects of High Cortisol Levels. Women to Women.

Menopause and the mind

menopause-forgetfulness

Hormonal imbalances cause a whole host of unwelcome changes throughout the menopause. While the physical changes can have dramatic and often unexpected consequences, it is the cognitive effects of hormonal imbalance that can often prove the most disconcerting for women of a menopausal age.

This can take the form of anything from forgetfulness to fatigue – but there is an answer that naturally restores balance to your mind and body, without the concerning health risks of HRT, and that’s restorative medicine.    

So what are the potential psychological effects of the menopause if left untreated?

1. Anxiety

Reduced levels of oestrogens circulating in the bloodstream can cause intense anxiety during the menopause. A lack of these hormones causes irregular production of serotonin and dopamine – the neurotransmitters that control your emotions. This might cause you to experience an anxiety attack, or a series of attacks in succession that can then lead to depression if left unchecked.   

2. Mood swings

Mood swings are a fact of life for many, but can be greatly exacerbated by the hormonal imbalance that affects you during perimenopause and menopause. Even if triggered by something innocuous, the feeling is very real and can be debilitating. Again, this is caused by reduced oestrogens levels affecting neurotransmitters, but can also be worsened by other menopausal symptoms.   

3. Fatigue

The debilitating feeling of fatigue is a sure sign of hormonal imbalance. During perimenopause and menopause, your energy levels may drop, making you feel weak and listless – like a light has been switched off. A whole range of hormones are associated with fatigue: progesterone and oestrogens control mood and sexual desire, while the relation of cortisol levels to Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) can cause increased stress.

4. Foggy memory

You’ve probably heard of a ‘menopausal moment’, and while this falls some way short of a compassionate and supportive outlook, foggy memory is the reason this saying gained popularity. The signs can be subtle: you might start misplacing items, forgetting people’s birthdays or losing your train of thought. Whatever the signs, memory lapses are caused by a decline in oestrogens and the de-stabilisation of stress hormones.

5. Insomnia

Insomnia during the perimenopause and menopause is a vicious circle. Affecting women up to seven years before the menopause truly commences, insomnia is caused by hormonal imbalances – but sleep is the only process by which the hormones you need can be regenerated. Insomnia can have dramatic effects on daytime functionality, as well as raising the risk, in the long-term, of secondary health conditions such as heart disease.

Restorative medicine

How can it help?

Bioidentical Hormone Restorative Therapy not only helps you to regain your optimal hormonal composition, it also enables you to avoid the health risks associated with synthetic treatments.

Achieving this chemical balance helps to address all of the hormonal symptoms of the menopause, not just physical conditions like weight gain, hot flushes and a reduced immune system, but also cognitive faculties.  

What are the benefits over conventional treatment?

Bioidentical hormones are an exact match for compounds found within the body and so can be fully metabolised, but synthetic hormones are an alien chemical make-up that cannot be read, fully understood, used and excreted by the body. A whole series of studies have found that synthetic HRT compounds create an unacceptable risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease, as well as failing to work as effectively as restorative medicine.

While the maximum length of treatment for conventional HRT is just five years as a result of these risks, bioidentical hormones can be used for life with no secondary side effects. Synthetic hormones are designed by drug companies as a one-size-fits-all solution, but in contrast, restorative medicine is tailored by specialists to each individual’s hormonal composition, helping to restore the real you.

Find out how you can use restorative medicine to re-discover your balance and avoid any loss of control over your head space.

Why I Wrote The Menopause Cure Book

There are a number of reasons I wanted to write my book, one was to share my story of the menopause, and the other was to share the information I found whilst researching and studying restorative medicine.

Women are suffering needlessly all the time when there is a viable, safe, and effective solution out there – The Menopause Cure. The overall goal of my book is to offer women that alternative, and to explain that there is no need to suffer in silence or be fobbed off by doctors saying, “It’s just the menopause.” I desperately wanted to share my knowledge and show women there was another way, a better way.

When I started going through the menopause, it brought changes I didn’t understand. Every day of the week there was a different problem: mood swings, lack of energy, can’t-cope syndrome, grumpy, a generally unhappy person. A personality change had occurred, and I really didn’t like myself anymore. I was tearing my hair out. Help!

However, I was determined that the menopause wouldn’t defeat me, wouldn’t stifle my career or break up my family. I decided that I had to make this inevitable destiny an enjoyable one. I set out to find the Menopause Cure.

I went to many doctors and gynaecologists to find a solution, but to no avail. All I got was a mixture of anger and ignorance. My anger and their ignorance. I was not getting the answers I wanted! This is when I decided to begin my indepth research into restorative medicine – finally I discovered something that would change my life forever. Something other than the ‘high risk’ chemical HRT that was continually being offered to me. What I discovered was a natural, no risk solution – Bioidentical Hormone Restorative Therapy (BHRT), and its leading proponent – Dr Dzugan.

Now my life, my hormones, and my energy are back to where they should be, and yours can be too. Women no longer need to put up with being told “It’s only the menopause, it’ll pass!” We can do something about it, so let’s do it! We can restore our hormones and get back the you that you once were! This was the best decision I ever made in my life.

Women should know all the facts about menopause and what it actually is. Our hormones are declining and we are aging, and there is something we can do about it! Turn back the clock, open all those doors that have been violently closed! Shout out to the World “I am coming out, and have nothing to be ashamed of! “I am a menopausal women and I am proud of it!” I am a menopausal woman, who restored her body and got her ‘mojo’ back! Yes, you heard right, ‘there ain’t no stopping me now’. You shouldn’t stop either.

Jill D Davey’s book The Menopause Cure: Hormonal Health is out on the 6th October and available to buy on Amazon.com for £8.99

My hot flush! Described by 5 real women.

Describing a hot flush as a ‘sensation of warmth’ just doesn’t cut the mustard, when we know there are woman utterly blindsided by their first attack.

You say hot flash, we say hot flush!

The standard description of the British hot flush is a sudden feeling of feverish heat. In the United States they are more commonly known as a hot flash and described as temporary but recurring episodes of flushing with a sensation of warmth or heat.

What we can all agree on, is for the 75% of women affected during the perimenopause, they can be deeply unsettling, distressing and, on occasion, make life darn near impossible. Women experiencing an abrupt decline in oestrogens often suffer the worst.

So, fans at the ready, we’ve scoured forums and the blogosphere to share the most descriptive accounts of a hot flush on the web. If you are going through hell with hot flushes you may find a little comfort in knowing you are not alone.

And for the lucky ones… read on and be better prepared to help; turn the heating down, keep a spare ice pack at home (and at work) and cover for your girlfriends when they need you too!

We’ve got your back! #WomenRock

Darcey Steinke on wanting to kill the menopause

“Hot flashes are inner apocalypses, singeing the body and the brain. During my first volcanic night sweat, a chaotic force moved through me. Heat rose, busting through the top of the thermometer, and swept through my body like the special effect I’d once seen on the set of a horror movie. Flames spread through a wire and rose up encircling a cabin. It was horrible, but also exquisite. Finally, I thought, God was going to communicate with me physically. Like a biblical character, I felt overwhelmed, scared, and sublime.”

Read the full article, What Menopause Taught Me, on NYMag.com for a wonderfully raw account with a surprisingly uplifting conclusion.

 Lesley Grant Timmins on threading a moving needle

“My first hot flush started with a chill, followed by a roaming band of heat that crawled up my legs to my back, all the way to my scalp. Soon I was drenched in sweat. Within the next few months the pattern took hold, repeating every half-hour to 45 minutes, interrupting every daytime activity and, worse, sleep.”

Read the full blog, Confessions of a hot flush queen, on Alive.com

Girlywhirly answering a plea for help on Mumsnet

“My flushes feel like the blast of heat you get when stepping into a hot sauna, except that the heat is from your inside! I don’t seem to break into a sweat though. The ‘heat’ lasts for about 30-40 secs and subsides. I know what you mean about the duvet! I push the duvet on and off and stick a leg out at the side. DH and I have only a 4.5 tog duvet all winter. I think my neck sweats most at night. In my case, I am interested to note that these ‘flushes’ disappear when a period is due, for a couple of weeks before and after, although this is only twice a year now (age 51).”

Read the full discussion, Please describe a hot flush to me, on Mumsnet.com

Skinny And Single on how the bitch turned

“The wonder of going from cold to roasting in an instant. The wonder of bleeding through 17 layers of cotton, two towels and a mattress. The wonder of my new beard. That’s cool though, people have a new beard fetish lately, I’m good to go. I guess I’m just old, I’m going grey and getting deep wrinkles. I have random pains and the occasional limp. But hey, when I was 23, I had problems too, I’d rather be here, any day. This shit’s a breeze, I got this. PS: I just want my armpits to dry.”

Read the blog, Rest In Peace To My Uterus, on Skinny And Single

Barbara Younger on hot flashes at school

“I could barely respond. I was standing there, in the middle of the circle of students–my favorite format for conducting class– trying to keep my “cool” and remember what I was doing there. I had felt a hot flash mounting up my legs from the very bottom of my feet, increasing temperature as it ascended, until it got to its highest tension in my face and head. It then erupted in visible sweat that flashed my face and made my neck and armpits moist. It was a power surge indeed, and my face was red as a tomato and my consciousness astral travelling. When I was able to finally come back to my senses, I sat down in front of twenty faces that looked at me in horror. And then I calmly said: “It’s a hot flash!”

Read the rest of the blog to find out how she got coped through the class in Friend For The Ride

We’d love to hear more personal descriptions of a hot flush. Have you read one that should be included on our list. Can you share your own experience of a hot flush with us?

September is Menopause Awareness month and we’d really like to get the message out – no more suffering alone. Sharing experiences and tips can and do help.

If you’d like to contribute please leave a comment below.